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Household Dangers
The efficient respiratory tract of the bird means they are extremely susceptible to the irritating, toxic, and potentially fatal effects of inhaling strong fumes and/or vapors. The most well known problem is the potentially fatal release of toxic Teflon gas from super heated nonstick cookware. Other non-stick items include stove drip pans, irons, ironing board covers, bread makers, and other household appliances. Always keep your bird out of the room when using spray product of any kind.  

Problems Have Been Reported With: 

  • Air Fresheners, including Plug- Ins, Potpourri, Carpet Fresheners and Incense
  • Hair Spray, Deodorant, Fingernail Polish and Polish Remover,Colognes and Perfumes
  • Ammonia, Bleach, Stain Removers,Bathroom Cleaners (and any other caustic cleaning products)
  • Oven Cleaners and Fumes from Self-cleaning Ovens
  • Insecticides of Any Type 

​Potential Hazards:

  • Open toilet lids and filled bath tubs
  • Large open containers of water
  • Ceiling fans
  • Large mirrors
  • Temperature extremes (cage placed near exterior doors, air vents, direct sunlight)

Keep Out of Your Bird's Reach:

  • electrical cords
  • Toxic household plants 
  • Soft plastic rubber items 
  • Pressure-treated wood
  • Paper with lots of colored inks
  • Heavy metals may be found in a variety of household items including leaded stained glass decoration, some mini blinds, old paint on woodwork, costume jewelry, and curtain weights. 

Finally, beware of other household pets who may unintentionally or intentionally chew on your bird. If dogs and cats share real estate space with your feathered friend never leave them unsupervised.

References

Blanchard S. Companion Parrot Handbook. PBIC, Inc.; Alameda, CA., 1999. Pp. 66, 131.

Stoltz JH, Galey F, Johnson B. Sudden death in ten psittacine birds associated with the operation of a self-cleaning oven. Veterinary and Human Toxicology 34(5): 420-421, 1992.